WAW Results – Menopause and Work

The relationships between menstrual status, experience of menopause-related symptoms and enjoyment and engagement at work were also examined.

The differences between mean scale scores by menstrual status were tested for statistical significance. After controlling for age, none of the measured work outcomes differed by menstrual status. This suggests that a woman’s menstrual stage may not have a discernible effect on her engagement at work, how much she enjoys her job, her intention to quit or affective commitment to the organisation.

However, the relationships between menopause and work were then analysed further, by examining the relationships between the frequency and bothersomeness of menopause-related symptoms and the four work outcomes (work engagement, job satisfaction, organisational commitment and intention to quit). The findings from these analyses are reflected in Figure 2 below.

Figure 2 – The relationships between the frequency and bothersomeness of menopause-related symptoms and work outcomes among peri-menopausal and post-menopausal women (N = 601)*

freq and bothj

* Linear regressions were conducted to examine these relationships; age was controlled for in these analyses.

Figure 2 suggests that among peri- and post-menopausal women, the more frequently women experienced menopause-related symptoms, the less engaged they felt at work, less satisfied with their job, less committed to the organisation they work for, with a greater intention to quit their job. The same relationships were observed for symptom bothersomeness.

These findings suggest that the experience of menopause-related symptoms negatively impacts on women’s experience at work and that this occurs independently of the age-related effects on work experiences.

Workplace Conditions and Health

Participants were presented with a list of occupational health and safety related workplace conditions and were asked “Does your current workplace have any of the following in place?” Responses are displayed in Figure 3.

Figure 3 – Percentage of participants who reported that they have the following conditions or procedures in place at their work (N = 839)*

Click image to enlarge.

workplace conditions figure

*Question: “Does your current workplace have any of the following in place?”

As can be seen in Figure 3, most women reported that they have a flexible work environment (i.e. flexibility in working hours, working arrangements and sickness absence procedures). Only 30% of respondents reported that they had control over the temperature of their immediate working environment. Significantly, further analysis revealed that women who reported that they had control over the temperature reported fewer bothersome menopause-related symptoms and reported experiencing menopause-related symptoms less frequently. This finding supports the need for an accommodating infrastructure that allows employees to modify the temperature in their offices if required. Very few participants indicated that their workplace provided support (formal or informal) or line management training on the menopause (3% or less).

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